There's a future for every talent in our innovative food & fibre sectors.

Over $3.5 million a year to grow primary industries talent

2 May 2016

Young Kiwis with an interest in the primary industries can apply for over $3.5 million in study assistance each year, says Andy Somerville of GrowingNZ.

GrowingNZ is representing the primary industries at the upcoming national Career Expo series.

GrowingNZ’s new directory presents more than 150 types of scholarship offered by a wide range of organisations. These are targeted at secondary-level students to help them in their next step, or to students on tertiary courses.

“This adds up to nearly 1000 individual scholarships being handed out each year.

“The common factor is that all these scholarships are for young people with an interest in helping take quality food and fibre to the world, or working with water, land, plants or animals – which is what the primary industries are about.

“We have many challenges and opportunities – such as reducing our environmental footprint. We are looking to young people to help shape the future of these important industries, which earn about 70% of New Zealand’s export income each year.

“The roles range from water scientists and robotics engineers to food safety specialists and the farmers of the future who will work with sophisticated technologies. 

“And the scholarships focus on different personal strengths or subject areas, so every young person should have a look to see what could be there for them.

“For students and their families wanting to know more about the primary industries, we will be at the Career Expos coming up in Christchurch, Auckland, Hamilton and Wellington in May and June.”

The scholarships directory is on the GrowingNZ website www.growingnz.org.nz

GrowingNZ is an initiative of the Primary Industry Capability Alliance, a membership organisation. The members are: DairyNZ, Beef+Lamb NZ, Ministry for Primary Industries, NZ Young Farmers, Primary ITO, Lincoln University, Taratahi Agricultural Training Centre, Ara Institute of Canterbury, Foundation for Arable Research and Forest Owners Association.